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dc.creatorJannidis, Fotis
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-06T14:36:26Z
dc.date.available2022-01-06T14:36:26Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttps://mediarep.org/handle/doc/18680
dc.description.abstractComputer Games have long been viewed as a preparatory hell for juvenile deliquents before they blossom into rampage killers. But this view has changed not the least because nowadays most people under 30 have actively played games. Nevertheless there still seems to be a deep gap between computer games and art. My talk will try to close the gap by using concepts developed in the studies of popular culture to describe the new and already famous game S.T.A.L.K.E.R. in relation to the paradigms of the ego-shooter genre. In contrast to the Cultural Studies approach and their focus on the reception process, this talk will focus on the game and view it as a work of modern popular art and try to contribute to a hermeneutics of this kind of art.en
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherRoberto Simanowski
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDichtung Digital. Journal für Kunst und Kultur digitaler Medien
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/
dc.subjectvideo gameen
dc.subjectgenre theoryen
dc.subject.ddcddc:791
dc.titleOn Genre Theory and Popular Artsen
dc.typearticle
dc.type.statuspublishedVersion
local.subject.wikidatahttps://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q3919738
local.source.spage1
local.source.epage3
local.source.issue1
local.source.volume10
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25969/mediarep/17716
dc.subject.workS.T.A.L.K.E.R.
local.source.issueTitleNr. 38
dc.relation.isPartOfissn:1617-6901
dc.publisher.placeProvidence
local.coverpage2022-01-06T15:41:27


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