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dc.creatorStar, Susan Leigh
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-15T07:46:17Z
dc.date.available2022-06-15T07:46:17Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttps://meiner.de/artikel/1000106309
dc.identifier.urihttps://mediarep.org/handle/doc/19559
dc.description.abstractResidual categories such as »not elsewhere categorized« densely populate modern information systems. This article roughly categories two types of modern information surveillance and notification systems, statistical and event-based. It examines the nature of residual categories arising from each, and proposes some methodological considerations for how these impact moral order within information infrastructure. The article concludes with comments about how the inclusion of lived experience might ameliorate a sort of moral gridlock often encountered today in large-scale information systems.en
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherFelix Meiner
dc.relation.ispartofseriesZMK Zeitschrift für Medien- und Kulturforschung
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.subjectInformationssystemede
dc.subjectInformationsüberwachungde
dc.subjectinformation systemsen
dc.subjectinformation surveillanceen
dc.subject.ddcddc:300
dc.titleResidual Categories: Silence, Absence and Being an Otheren
dc.typearticle
dc.type.statuspublishedVersion
local.source.spage201
local.source.epage219
local.source.issue1
local.source.volume1
dc.identifier.doi10.28937/1000106309
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25969/mediarep/18434
local.source.issueTitleKulturtechnik
dc.relation.isPartOfissn:1869-1366
dc.publisher.placeHamburg
local.coverpage2022-06-15T10:05:49


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