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dc.creatorHesselberth, Pepita
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-26T11:39:49Z
dc.date.available2018-09-26T11:39:49Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.necsus-ejms.org/test/from-subject-effect-to-presence-effect-a-deictic-approach-to-the-cinematic/
dc.identifier.urihttps://mediarep.org/handle/doc/3210
dc.description.abstractThe late 1990s and first decade of the 21st century saw the release of a number of films that are decidedly self-referential about time and invoke a sophisticated media-literacy on the part of the viewer. In these films past, present, and future are often portrayed as highly mutable domains that can easily be accessed, erased, (re)designed, or modified. Examples include: SOURCE CODE (Duncan Jones, 2011), INCEPTION (Christopher Nolan, 2010), SHERLOCK HOLMES (Guy Ritchie, 2009), NEXT (Lee Tamahori, 2007), DÉJÀ VU (Tony Scott, 2006), THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT (Eric Bress; J. Mackye Gruber, 2004), PAYCHECK (John Woo, 2003), ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND (Michel Gondry, 2004), MINORITY REPORT (Steven Spielberg, 2002), DONNIE DARKO (Richard Kelly, 2001), and many more. As theoretical objects, these cases stand out for the ways they deploy their own artistic potential to foreground, articulate, and conjure critical thought about their own temporality and the modes of existence they afford. These films can be called post-classical to the extent that they resist classical modes of cinematic storytelling in favor of what Warren Buckland has called ‘puzzle plots’ – i.e., they are films in which the ‘arrangement of events is not just complex, but complicated and perplexing’.en
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherAmsterdam University Press
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNECSUS. European Journal of Media Studies
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0
dc.subjectFilmde
dc.subjectDeixisde
dc.subjectEffektde
dc.subjectPräsenzde
dc.subjectSubjektde
dc.subjectKörperkontaktde
dc.subjectcinemaen
dc.subjectdeixisen
dc.subjecteffecten
dc.subjectpresenceen
dc.subjectsubjecten
dc.subjecttangibilityen
dc.subject.ddcddc:791
dc.titleFrom subject-effect to presence-effect – A deictic approach to the cinematicen
dc.typearticle
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHesselberth, Pepita (2012): From subject-effect to presence-effect – A deictic approach to the cinematic. In: NECSUS. European Journal of Media Studies 1 (2), 241–267. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5117/NECSUS2012.2.HESS.
dc.type.statuspublishedVersion
dc.subject.personDuncan Jones
local.subject.gndhttps://d-nb.info/gnd/143555316
local.subject.wikidatahttps://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q266209
local.subject.wikidatahttps://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q552731
local.source.spage241
local.source.epage267
local.source.issue2
local.source.volume1
dc.identifier.doi10.5117/NECSUS2012.2.HESS
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25969/mediarep/15058
dc.subject.workSOURCE CODE
dc.relation.isPartOfissn:2213-0217
dc.publisher.placeAmsterdam
local.coverpage2021-05-29T05:17:28
local.identifier.firstpublishedhttps://doi.org/10.5117/NECSUS2012.2.HESS


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